cardstock paper for an HP Photosmart 1215

Discussion in 'Hewlett Packard' started by Skroob, Jan 3, 2004.

  1. Skroob

    Skroob Guest

    I'm looking for some cardstock (as heavy as i can get it to work with my HP
    1215) to do some portfolio printing on. Ive searched Hp.com and masterg.com
    for ideas, but i found nothing. Anyone have any success with heavy ardstocks
    on HP's?

    Thanks.
     
    Skroob, Jan 3, 2004
    #1
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  2. On Sat, 03 Jan 2004 03:41:51 GMT, Skroob wrote:

    =>I'm looking for some cardstock (as heavy as i can get it to work with my HP
    =>1215) to do some portfolio printing on. Ive searched Hp.com and masterg.com
    =>for ideas, but i found nothing. Anyone have any success with heavy ardstocks
    =>on HP's?
    =>
    =>Thanks.

    I've used "cover stock" on both HP660C and Epson Color 740.
    Cover stock is a generic term for heavy papers around
    60-100lbs weight. (For comparison, business cards for
    ink-jet use are about 40lb stock; filefolders are around
    the same weight.) I experienced no problems with paper
    feed. Your printer may have a setting for heavier papers -
    of so, use it. Heavier "cardboard" (anything over 100lb)
    should be printable on any straight - through printer that
    can print CDs. A good art supply store should have a
    suitable range of papers, and in colours, too. I'm sure
    they'll sell you a selection for experimenting with. You
    could also talk to your local print-shop - our local
    printer is very friendly, and I've learned a lot from him
    about paper, ink, and such.

    IMO, you may have more trouble finding a paper compatible
    with the HP's inks. Ink + paper matching is always a gamble
    when you depart from manufacturer's specs. One thing to
    watch out for is a slow change in the colours as the ink
    reacts with the paper chemistry - this may take a week or
    more to see (and I'm not talking about fading due to
    light.)
     
    Wolf Kirchmeir, Jan 3, 2004
    #2
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  3. Skroob

    OT Guest

    I've had good luck (using Epsons) with Wausau "Bright White Premium
    Card Stock" purchased at Office Depot. It is claimed to be acid-free
    and lignin-free, and is also inkjet compatible. It makes good
    cardstock for Christmas cards and the like. I suspect that some
    cheaper cardstocks contain acids that take revenge on dye inks,
    sometimes immediately.

    For really heavy card material, you might want to look at archival
    museum board, usually available from artist's supply houses.
     
    OT, Jan 3, 2004
    #3
  4. Skroob

    Skroob Guest

    OK, thanks for the advice, everyone.

    Think i will check out Office Deopt. thanks.
     
    Skroob, Jan 3, 2004
    #4
  5. On Sat, 03 Jan 2004 15:42:53 GMT, OT wrote:

    => I suspect that some
    =>cheaper cardstocks contain acids that take revenge on dye inks,
    =>sometimes immediately.

    A lot of "acid free papers" are buffered -- ie, not acid
    free at all, just laced with a base to neutralise the acid.
    There are no regulations about what "acid free" is supposed
    to mean. Good thing we don't eat paper. :)

    Also, dyes, bleaches, whiteners, and fillers all have their
    own chemistry. Even inthe "regular" printing trade,
    printers have to watch out for ink - paper compatibility
    problems.
     
    Wolf Kirchmeir, Jan 4, 2004
    #5
  6. Skroob

    iforte Guest

    I use an HP CP1160 and print heavy card stock. For a portfolio piece, I
    would suggest using a heavy photo paper and then mounting it onto a black
    cardboard or card stock. I've done this with scrapbooks.
     
    iforte, Jan 6, 2004
    #6
  7. Skroob

    Bud Haynes Guest

    I have used 90 and 110lb card stock in 3 different HP's (ink jet and laser)
    with no problems but they sure won't go through my Brother 1440 laser.
    I get my stock from Staples.
    Bud
     
    Bud Haynes, Feb 5, 2004
    #7
  8. Skroob

    bencowles

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    How do all these "lb" specs translate to "g/m squared"(75-300 for my DJ3632 printer) that HP uses for their specs on supported paper or millimeters or inches, as I've measured my paper to be a bit less than .5mm. Thanks
     
    bencowles, Sep 3, 2017
    #8
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